Thursday, July 28, 2016

Los Angeles leads ‘Highways from Hell’ rankings

If you have a least favorite stretch of highway to drive on, there’s a good chance it’s in Los Angeles. According to a new study by the Auto Insurance Center, Los Angeles is to blame for six of the nation’s top 10 “Highways from Hell.”

Two different stretches of U.S. Highway 101 in Los Angeles are deemed the two busiest highways in the United States.

U.S. 101’s path from Topanga Canyon Boulevard to Vignes Street received top billing. Despite being only 26 miles long, the trip takes an average of 91 minutes during peak rush hour. The study also found that the average speed is 17 mph, and the worst time is 8 a.m. on Wednesdays.

No. 2 on the list is U.S. 101’s 21.8-mile stretch from Soto Street to Haskell Avenue. During rush hour, the trip typically takes about 70 minutes and drivers are confined to an average speed of 19 mph.

Los Angeles is also credited with having the third, sixth, eighth and ninth busiest highways. Interstate 10 from 20th Street to Alameda Street in Los Angeles is third. The 15-mile jaunt takes an average of 73 minutes. I-5 from Cesar E. Chavez Avenue to Valley View Avenue is sixth, while I-5 from Artesia Boulevard to Cesar E. Chavez Avenue and I-10 from the I-5/U.S. 101 junction to National Boulevard are eighth and ninth, respectively.

The other four highways to earn the dubious distinction are in Chicago and New York.

The complete list is:

  1. Los Angeles, U.S. 101 from Topanga Canyon Boulevard to Vignes Street
  2. Los Angeles, U.S. 101 from Soto Street to Haskell Avenue
  3. Los Angeles, I-10 from 20th Street to Alameda Street
  4. Chicago, I-90 from 35th Street to the junction of I-90 and I-94 North
  5. New York, I-678 from Rockaway Boulevard to Main Street
  6. Los Angeles, I-5 from Cesar E. Chavez Avenue to Valley View Avenue
  7. Chicago, I-90/I-94 from Montrose Avenue to Ruble Street
  8. Los Angeles, I-5 from Artesia Boulevard to Cesar E. Chavez Avenue
  9. Los Angeles, I-10 from the I-5/U.S. 101 junction to National Boulevard
  10. New York, I-495 from 74th Street to Mineola and Willis avenues.

But what do you think? Does the study have it right? If not, what are the stretches of highway that you dread the most and do your best to avoid?

While you’re at it, be sure to check out some of the other data revealed by the Auto Insurance Center. The study also includes information about the cost of traffic congestion, wasted fuel, and the cities with the worst traffic.