Wednesday, June 29, 2016

This again? “Don’t stop when you are tired.” C’mon Stevens…

(UPDATED: The original post was updated on Thursday, June 30, to include a statement to Land Line Magazine from Stevens Transport. See the full statement below.)

Facebook is not shy on content that has you alternating between laughing to shaking your head in disbelief. Stevens Transport had a recent post that clearly falls into the latter category.

Tucked in with a barrage of posts touting the wonderful career of trucking and how fantastic Stevens is to work for, was a recent post on Sunday, June 26, that speaks volumes on the true corporate mentality of not only Stevens but many major motor carriers.

As you can see, it trots out the old sports adage “Don’t quit when you’re tired. Quit when you’re done.” It boggles my mind that this saying keeps popping up in trucking – on public forums especially. It’s not even the first time I’ve written about a motor carrier using the phrase to “motivate” drivers.

Now this Stevens Facebook post wasn’t one that someone clicked on and shared without thinking about it. There was real effort put into it. They made the image. They consciously put that out there for all to see thinking it somehow it would inspire.

Only it didn’t.

Adam Berry fired back in the comments:
“... unless you are driving an 80,000-pound truck. If you are driving an 80,000-pound truck, please by all means stop when you are tired so’s you don’t kill nobody... Hmm?”

Nancy Baron chimed in:
“This the stupidest post ever! Stop when you are tired! Idiots!”

There are some more choice words for Stevens in the comment section. But, they are 100 percent in disagreement and disbelief of the post.

Social media mistakes happen. Sure. But, what shouldn’t happen is a corporate environment that cloaks itself in a safety message, but pushes drivers relentless in the name of efficiency and productivity.

Stevens Transport is likely a very good example of this. The company runs electronic logs. The “silver bullet” technology to make the highways safer – at least that’s what the big dog motor carriers want everyone to believe.

Start peeling back the layers and you see a clearly different reality.

For starters, Stevens Transport’s more than 2,000 trucks and 2,500 drivers have a pretty small number of violations of hours of service. We’ll give them that. Their paperwork is in shape thanks to the logs, so there’s no chance for the penny-ante form and manner violations.

But let’s look at what really matters. How are those trucks being driven on the highways? Whoops. Not such a rosy picture here.

Stevens’ trucks have been inspected for unsafe driving (that’s basically getting pulled over) 434 times in the past two years, resulting in 453 violations. Nearly one-third of those violations are for speeding-related violations. The vast majority of those were 6 to 10 mph over the posted speed limit.

That’s what happens when you push drivers. They speed to get done. They are on the clock, under the gun, getting only paid by the mile and things start getting dicey on sane decision making.

The motor carrier also has 204 reportable crashes in the past two years – five of those fatal, 64 with injuries. Since FMCSA doesn’t attribute fault on any crash reports, it would be inappropriate to try and speculate on the cause given the limited public detail.

Pushing drivers for the sake of a load is simply irresponsible, unforgiveable. Yet it’s a reality that goes on every day out here.

Stevens hasn’t responded to my request for comment on the post. And as of this posting, the Facebook post was pulled down.

Well, here’s to hoping that drivers can get the message through and reject this sort of treatment by large motor carriers. Because, well wait. I’ll let Jason Davis say it. He nails the point beautifully in his comment:

“Literally the single most important time to stop is when you are tired. I guess done could also mean dead.”

UPDATE:
The following statement was sent to Land Line Magazine by Stevens Transport on Thursday, June 30.

"The post that appeared on our Facebook page was uploaded by an intern who has been with Stevens Transport for only a few weeks and whose inexperience led him to include a message that was both tone deaf and wrong. We want to sincerely apologize to anyone who was rightly offended because we understand how this looks. Obviously, we have installed new policies and procedures to make sure this doesn’t happen again. The well-being of our drivers and other motorists is the number one goal of everyone who works at Stevens Transport, as evidenced by our safety record. We are proud to work with some of the best drivers in the world, and we in no way condone the notion that was communicated in the earlier post."

(Editor's note: H/T to OOIDA Member Lynn Paul for turning us on to this post.)


46 comments:

  1. After reading this article the sad part is you say Jasons post is beautiful,,It is STILL INCORRECT!!!! The time to stop is BEFORE you are tired.
    Proper rest and planning eliminates it!!! Kelly (Landstar and PROUD)

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    1. Great point Kelly. I still appreciate his sentiment, but you make the point even stronger. Thank you!

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    2. Wow Kelly. So you are proud to pull for under a dollar a mile ?

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    3. All the trip planning in the world will never overcome shippers and receivers that view us as nothing more than a truck to be loaded/unloaded whenever. Make THEM accountable and then the rest will fall in line

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    4. Kim I have pulled some land star loads in the past few weeks that pay over $2 a mile I don't work directly for them I go thru a broker not all there loads pay bad just have to look for the right ones

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    5. Michael Preston, you're 100% correct. It starts with the customer.

      Kim, you're a moron. Let him work where he wants if he's happy. Worry about your own happiness (which is probably minimal seeing you like to belittle other's choices) & just let people do their own thing. He doesn't need your approval.

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    6. I will say as a former safety instructor for Stevens transport they do pish a trip plan on every load.as far as the post goes it must have been an error.also a former driver for Stevens I know if you are tired they will repower your load or change your appointment time.

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    7. I will say as a former safety instructor for Stevens transport they do pish a trip plan on every load.as far as the post goes it must have been an error.also a former driver for Stevens I know if you are tired they will repower your load or change your appointment time.

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    8. I worked for them for a year and the trucks are governed unless your an O/O so how did they get that many speeding tickets is what I want to know. They are the only company I ever worked for that pushed safety to the extreme.

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    9. Michael Preston, you're 100% correct. It starts with the customer.

      Kim, you're a moron. Let him work where he wants if he's happy. Worry about your own happiness (which is probably minimal seeing you like to belittle other's choices) & just let people do their own thing. He doesn't need your approval.

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    10. The main reason drivers are driving when they shouldn't be driving is the stupid ass 14 hr rule that the government put on us

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    11. Kim,,,,Im sure you are a miserable person who doesn't understand trucking,,,As for Landstar Ive been her for 4 years and NEVER hauled for a dollar a mile, and only 3 times for under 2 dollars a mlie.So crawl back into your life and don't worry about mine.Im very happy and content.Have a GREAT day,,, Kelly Landstar PROUD!!!!

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  2. Now that is the corporate mentality in it's full idiotic form. That, after 204 reportable crashes in two years. Five of which were fatalities. Then Steven's post this ludicrous statement for all to see. Well, I guess the defense attorneys in these fatality crashes (even if only one was Stevens' at fault) just lost their cases .. how could you defend this operational policy in any jurisdiction?? (Because MY prosecuting attorney would have this information by now!!) Find a buyer Stevens. Times up.

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  3. WAIT!! 204 reportable crashes in TWO years. What is a "reportable accident" ?? If either vehicle is "towed" from the scene, if any injured person is transported by ambulance from the scene, or if there is any fatality. 52 weeks in a year ... that's TWO a WEEK!! AND nearly one-fifth of the workforce (453 out of 2,500 drivers) cited for unsafe driving also in a two year period. I think they need to worry less about their social media presence and need to rebrand their management from the very top on down. Sell Stevens .. SELL!!

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  4. What do you expect trying to move those meat loads on e logs at 62 mph?

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  5. So, over 100 violations for speeding, in trucks that are governed? Well that just clinches it, we must have all trucks governed for the public safety, umm wait what?

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    1. that only means they were speeding when the speed limit was less than 60 miles per hr like in school zones work zones city driving and such so I suppose that 62 mph is for all zones one speed for everything wide open!!!

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  6. THAT'S A FAKE CAPTION. IT'S A MEME. ANYONE CAN CREATE ONE.

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    1. That is a screen capture of an actual Facebook post by Stevens Transport. Look at it closer.

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    2. Look at the update. Stevens acknowledged that it came from them

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  7. "Off Ramp" ParkerJune 29, 2016 at 8:57 PM

    Quit when I'm done? When is that? I'll stop when I'm tired. Fire me.

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  8. Stevens has and always will be a piece of shit carrier.

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  9. STOP electronic logbooks !!!

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  10. Looks like nothing has changed at stevens

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  11. If this actually happened there would be other references to the facebook post. Stevens Transport should OOIDA and Jami Jones for libel.

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    1. Do you even social media, bro?

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    2. Darling...read the whole article through. Stephens admits one of their interns posted it

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    3. Except I don't buy that an "intern" did it. All companies put the blame on some "new" employee. It's BS.

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    4. Why was an intern given this job to complete in the first place? Where was the intern's supervisor? Did the supervisor give the "OK" on this without reading it?

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  12. The speeding violations come because driver have to speed ! How do I come up with saying this ? It's fucking simple you govern a truck to 62 mph to save on insurance great for the company ! Sucks for the driver trying to feed his family and his self ! 95% of interstates in the United states are set at 70 mph . Yet the trucks are govern to 62 mph so for hours that driver does 62 mph he hits a construction zone set at 45 mph yet he has a window to get a load to the receiver at a certain time the only way he can make the load on time is by running at least 60 mph the whole run so he gets the load there on time and doesn't drive over the 11 hr mark . This driver has to make a choice get the load there on time or not well if the load doesn't make it on time then the driver gets fucked on his next run because he couldn't make his deliver on time so the driver opts to speed in a construction zone . The government trucks are killing drivers making us run harder and faster when speed limits are below said 62 mph . If our trucks could run 70 mph then most drivers would slow down in small towns and construction zones because we aren't trying to beat the clock . We are able to run the speed limit giving us the ability to do 70 miles per hour vs 62 miles that's 8 extra miles per hour which doesn't sound like much until your talking 11 hr days X2 if your team driving that's giving you 176 miles driven more per 24 hr period. Ruffly $81 more a day making 46 cents a mile that's $567 dollars a week so that's $283 per week to each driver on the pay check times 4 weeks a month $1,134 per it adds up quick since most drivers stay out at least a month at a time .

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    1. It is never necessary to drive in an unsafe manner! Speeding in a construction zone is just pure disrespect for safety on the part of the driver and no one else! The company doesn't drive the truck, the shipper doesn't drive the truck, the scheduler and customer service reps do not drive the truck! If you are speeding under any circumstances you are driving unsafe! That's it you and only you are responsible for the safe operation of that truck. The hyper wants it when? Too bad it's gonna be late!

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    2. Shipper, not hyper!

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  13. The speeding violations come because driver have to speed ! How do I come up with saying this ? It's fucking simple you govern a truck to 62 mph to save on insurance great for the company ! Sucks for the driver trying to feed his family and his self ! 95% of interstates in the United states are set at 70 mph . Yet the trucks are govern to 62 mph so for hours that driver does 62 mph he hits a construction zone set at 45 mph yet he has a window to get a load to the receiver at a certain time the only way he can make the load on time is by running at least 60 mph the whole run so he gets the load there on time and doesn't drive over the 11 hr mark . This driver has to make a choice get the load there on time or not well if the load doesn't make it on time then the driver gets fucked on his next run because he couldn't make his deliver on time so the driver opts to speed in a construction zone . The government trucks are killing drivers making us run harder and faster when speed limits are below said 62 mph . If our trucks could run 70 mph then most drivers would slow down in small towns and construction zones because we aren't trying to beat the clock . We are able to run the speed limit giving us the ability to do 70 miles per hour vs 62 miles that's 8 extra miles per hour which doesn't sound like much until your talking 11 hr days X2 if your team driving that's giving you 176 miles driven more per 24 hr period. Ruffly $81 more a day making 46 cents a mile that's $567 dollars a week so that's $283 per week to each driver on the pay check times 4 weeks a month $1,134 per it adds up quick since most drivers stay out at least a month at a time .

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    1. the problem with this is yes the driver is getting paid by the mile but no everyone knows that its not actual miles they are getting paid they are getting paid zipcode to zipcode so when we do 1225 actual miles we are only getting paid for 1175 zipcode miles and this is how most trucking companies work and to top it off full teams if they are lucky split 50 cents per mile so lets do the math people that is 25 cents and 1175 miles and that doesnt include the taxes they take out of your paycheck or health insurance. So for the avarage truck driver whether it be a stevens driver or any other company driver they are lucky top dollar of about $850 a week before all the taxes and every thing is taken out of their paychecks and that is on a good week when a solo driver can do about 3000 zipcode to zipcode miles or a full team can do 6000 miles and when you have good drivers that have had no accidents that work for the company that you are talking about it makes me upset for one if you dont have groceries on the shelves at your local stores or clothing then who gets the blame oh the truck drivers out here trying to do their jobs the best they can and yes there are a lot of truck drivers that dont need to be out here. The fact of the matter is there are truck drivers like myself that look at the motoring public (cars) and think that could be my mother or my sister or one of my children in that car, in the same sense you also have to look at what us drivers go through on a daily basis how many accidents that are caused are actually the truck drivers fault. So in closing dont just blame one company for ones new persons accidental slip up on the computer when inputting a comment when they have probably never driven a truck in their life. For the speeding tickets its really simple if you the driver had planned your day/trip better then you would have no need to speed in a construction zone period. The total of what im saying is this the person driving the truck is in control of that truck no load is worth your life or someone elses the companies can either reschedule the load or repower it dont be like everyone else and play the blame game because if thats the case then you as the driver are just as much to blame as the companies!

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  15. UnknownJune 30, 2016 at 6:14 PM
    I worked for stevens. I never had any problems with shutting down. When I was tired. Excellent training.

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    1. Agree i stop whenever i deel it is necessary. I get good miles with them also

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  16. I work for stevens and if you are tired you can shut down with no problems from the company...

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  17. Elogs my ass. It doesn't stop dispatchers and DM'S from blowing up the drivers phone and Qualcomm during 10 and 34hr breaks. Rode with my hubby when he drove for them. They completely disregard off-duty hours and retaliate if you don't respond.

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    1. Exactly! This is a true statement. I don't believe the owner of this company and family really knows how this company is ran below their level

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  18. You guys are full of shit. My dispatcher when I drove for you pushed me everytime I questioned anything. Keep going get the load there. Same ol thing eveytime I aksed anything. Slow truck, getting cussed on the CB, non stop pressure to get there ... Bits

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  19. i took a tape recorder on truck when i was a stevens student.first trainer coke addict. second trainer meth head.she robbed me and through me out of truck 3 am on docks in philly.the assholes did not get my tape recorder.when i got back to texas they demanded tapes.angela the owners daughter said she would have me arrested for recording driver.i told her to f**k herself.give me my certificate drop the loan or tapes went to osha.bingo free school.

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  20. I worked for Stevens and no one has mentioned that the vast majority of there drivers are new 2 the industry like 6 months new.
    So w/an inexperienced driver,e-logs,low CPM, and tight schedules because of perishable freight...???
    Hwy Heathen💀

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  21. How can their drivers rush when they're governed at 60mph.

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  22. The old "blame it on the new person" response. Right.

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