Friday, September 12, 2014

‘Would you please hide your pryin’ eyes?’

Chuck Winborn says it was about three months ago when he first noticed something off about the vent on the shower room door at a Flying J in his hometown of Birmingham, Ala.

Winborn, an owner-operator and OOIDA senior member, had pulled into the Flying J Truck Stop off Interstate 65 and Daniel Payne Drive for fuel and a shower, when he discovered a problem with the aluminum vent near the bottom of the shower room door.

“I noticed that the vent in the bottom of the door had been bent so that you could see through into the hallway,” he said. “I got down and looked at the vent closely and could see that the veins in the vent had been forced down where you could clearly see through.”

He said a person standing underneath the shower head wouldn’t be visible to a potential peeping Tom. But an unsuspecting patron on the commode, or walking into or out of the shower opening would be in full view.

“If you held a camera phone down there to the opening, you wouldn’t have to put your face down there to the crack. And somebody could be taking pictures and doing God knows what with them,” he said.

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Does Alabama DOT really make you sign oversized load permits only in red ink?

We hear a lot of stories about “red tape” when it comes to trucking. But OOIDA member Mickey Harris brought us a new one about “red ink” when he paid a visit to our HQ in Grain Valley earlier this summer.

Harris, an owner-operator out of Poplarville, Miss., was hauling an oversized load in the northbound lanes of Interstate 65 on May 20, when he was stopped by an Alabama DOT officer. The DOT officer issued Mickey a warning for having a violation on his oversized load permit, all because the permit wasn’t signed by the driver in red ink.

You read that right – oversized load permits in Alabama must be signed in red ink. Not black, not blue, but red.

“I told the (DOT) officer it was legal madness,” Harris said.

Why red? Was the ink pigment choice meant to be a tribute to the Crimson Tide? What gives?

We started making some phone calls to see if we could get to the bottom of this.

Monday, September 8, 2014

Big guns aim at coercion rule

“U.S. trucker coercion rule could impact global supply chains.”

Holy moly! Skyrocketing prices! Shippers and brokers in jail! The end of logistics as we know it!

OK, I’m overstating the case. But then, so are the industry groups quoted in the Journal of Commerce article under this headline. It’s all about reactions to the proposed FMCSA rule intended to protect you from coercion to break HOS rules.

Of course the rule, which finally acknowledges pressures on drivers, doesn’t go far enough. Enforcement depends on individual drivers to document coercion, file complaints, and follow through – not easily done or even possible when you’re dependent on relationships likely to explode if you complain.

But these guys have it the other way around.