Monday, August 25, 2014

Google’s self-driving car will be able to speed, for safety’s sake

We here at OOIDA HQ got a pretty big kick out of the headlines last week about Google’s autonomous car and its ability to speed if traffic conditions called for it.

The reason, according to a Reuters news service account of a test drive of the vehicle in California earlier this month, is because “Google’s engineers have determined that speeding is actually safer than going the speed limit in some circumstances.”

The cars are programmed to go up to 10 miles per hour above the posted speed limit, when traffic conditions warrant, because the company’s research shows that sticking to the speed limit when other drivers are going much faster can actually be hazardous.

This probably isn’t earth-shattering news to those of you who’ve stayed current on OOIDA positions when it comes to highway safety. Your Association has been advocating for uniform speeds on highways for both commercial and non-commercial vehicles.

Probably the most succinct explanation for why a company would design a self-driving vehicle to break the law was provided by Gizmodo, a blog focusing on gadgets and high-tech (emphasis added):

“While no one’s going to confuse the Google car with a drag-racing hot rod, it is interesting that the company would deliberately design the car to break the law. The reason is safety: When cars all around the Google car are speeding, going slower than those cars would actually make driving conditions more dangerous.

In a nutshell, that’s the same argument the Association has been making when it comes to installing speed limiters or governors on commercial trucks. By hamstringing the trucks, a rule that is ostensibly designed to promote “safety” may actually increase the likelihood of a dangerous situation by creating an environment where faster vehicles are maneuvering in and out of lanes to get around the slower ones.

Back in November, our own David Tanner had a special report about how federal regulators are pursuing speed limiters for heavy trucks, despite not having any real-world data to suggest the devices actually make a difference in road safety.

It shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise that a company known for being on the cutting-edge of innovation would be smart enough to recognize the hazard associated with speed limiters. Hopefully the regulators will be smart enough to follow suit.