Tuesday, October 7, 2014

‘Modern Family’ star working on new comedy set at truck stop


When it comes to untapped veins of comedy gold, TV’s Eric Stonestreet is banking on striking it rich with a show about truck stops.

Stonestreet, who plays Cameron Tucker on the ABC hit comedy Modern Family, has reached a deal to produce a sitcom that revolves around a truck stop in Kansas, according to a report from Deadline Hollywood.

A Kansas City, Kan., native who studied at Kansas State University in the “Little Apple” of Manhattan, Kan., Stonestreet’s truck stop project for ABC is called Big Stop. According to the report, the show will be “a modern take on family and today’s current issues as seen through the lens of a bustling Kansas truck stop where stories and characters, like big rigs, come rolling in off the highway every day.”

“Truck stops are the airports of the highways where all sorts of characters with their stories come through,” Stonestreet told the website. “It is relatable. No matter if you’re a businessman or a politician or a regular guy, we all find ourselves at a truck stop at one time or another.”

Big Stop will also be a throwback to classic TV sitcoms, making use of the multi-camera recording approach, used for shows shot in front of a studio audience (like The Cosby Show or Everybody Loves Raymond). Writer Jerry Collins, whose credits include The Bernie Mac Show, is attached to write. No timetable for development was disclosed.

Stonestreet’s not the first person in Tinsel Town to train a lens toward truck stops and travel centers. In 2011, the producers behind the hit show “Pawn Stars” gave us “Truck Stop, Missouri” a reality show about the colorful characters at Midway Truck Stop on I-70 near Columbia. That show lasted two seasons.

Hopefully the show won’t play for cheap laughs or reach for the low-hanging fruit of so many of the same tired clichés that have been tossed at truckers since the 1970s. There’s reason to be optimistic, given that Modern Family is regularly lauded for being a genuinely funny show. It’s also been praised for its realistic depictions of Los Angeles, where the show takes place, such as in this 2014 article from Slate.

It’s certainly easy to see the appeal of a truck stop serving as the hub of a comedy show. The airport analogy Stonestreet made is spot-on. There are all kinds of characters from all walks of life who manage to wander into or pass through a truck stop at one time or another. Here’s to hoping for a show that will focus on telling those stories, rather than settling for gross-out gags or a bunch of lot lizard jokes.

What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever seen at a truck stop? Tell us in the comments!